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Cove Fort

“Cove Fort: A Safe and Sacred Home”

SOURCES

“When all is said and done”: Gordon B. Hinckley, “Bring Up a Child in the Way He Should Go,” Ensign, Nov. 1993, 59.

“Say to the President”: Luna Adell Hinckley, in “Events in the Life of Ira Nathaniel Hinckley, 1828–1904: Pioneer, Churchman, Rancher,” comp. Parnell Hinckley (not published, 1966), 10; quoting Ira N. Hinckley.

“Our thoughts of a permanent home”: Luna Adell Hinckley, in “Events in the Life of Ira Nathaniel Hinckley,” 10–11.

Arza and skilled workmen who lived nearby: See Larry C. Porter, “A Historical Analysis of Cove Fort, Utah” (master’s thesis, Brigham Young University, 1966), 40–41.

Angeline came to the fort a month later: See L. Joel Durrant, ed., “Life Sketch’s [sic] about Ira N. Hinckley and Family” (not published, 1999), 2B; Larry C. Porter, “A Historical Analysis of Cove Fort, Utah,” 45, 100. Eliza Jane Hinckley’s mother was also named Eliza.

“Every morning and evening”: Arza Alonzo Hinckley, in Frank Beckwith, “Historic Old Cove Fort,” Improvement Era, Apr. 1927, 535.

“I can remember”: Luna Adell Hinckley, in “Events in the Life of Ira Nathaniel Hinckley,” 14.

By the time they were old enough: See Larry C. Porter, “A Historical Analysis of Cove Fort, Utah,” 127–28.

Most of the Hinckleys’ guests: See Ella Hinckley Hoopes, in Larry C. Porter, “A Historical Analysis of Cove Fort, Utah,” 71, 131; Edwin Smith Hinckley, in “Events in the Life of Ira Nathaniel Hinckley,” 15; Ira Noble Hinckley, in “Events in the Life of Ira Nathaniel Hinckley,” 47.

Visitors found Cove Fort: See Larry C. Porter, “A Historical Analysis of Cove Fort, Utah,” 95–96, 119, 143.

The Hinckley children swept: See Ella Hinckley Hoopes, in Larry C. Porter, “A Historical Analysis of Cove Fort, Utah,” 113–14, 117, 120.

They helped prepare and serve meals: See Larry C. Porter, “A Historical Analysis of Cove Fort, Utah,” 45, 116, 120.

They helped tend a garden: See Larry C. Porter, “A Historical Analysis of Cove Fort, Utah,” 67, 117–20.

The fort had tall, thick walls: See Brigham Young letter to Ira Hinckley, Apr. 12, 1867, Brigham Young Letter Book, vol. 10, 128–29, Church History Library, Salt Lake City; quoted in “Events in the Life of Ira Nathaniel Hinckley,” 10.

But those walls: See “Events in the Life of Ira Nathaniel Hinckley,” 13; Ella Hinckley Hoopes, in Larry C. Porter, “A Historical Analysis of Cove Fort, Utah,” 143.

In contrast, American Indians: See “Events in the Life of Ira Nathaniel Hinckley,” 12–13; Larry C. Porter, “A Historical Analysis of Cove Fort, Utah,” 143.

“Whenever father killed a beef”: Jean Hinckley Holbrook, in Larry C. Porter, “A Historical Analysis of Cove Fort, Utah,” 141–42.

“The thing that characterized [Father’s] religion”: Bryant Stringham Hinckley, in Sheri L. Dew, Go Forward with Faith: The Biography of Gordon B. Hinckley (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1996), 15.

“Well, I think your father was the best man”: Edwin Smith Hinckley, in “Events in the Life of Ira Nathaniel Hinckley,” 15.

“Historic Old Cove Fort”: Arza Alonzo Hinckley, in Frank Beckwith, “Historic Old Cove Fort,” 535.

“The years of happy life”: Luna Adell Hinckley, in “Events in the Life of Ira Nathaniel Hinckley,” 12.

 

Photograph of Elizabeth Kane courtesy of L. Tom Perry Special Collections, Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah. Do not copy.